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UPF 2018-08-15

 

Sun protective clothing is clothing specifically designed for sun protection and is produced from a fabric rated for its level of ultraviolet (UV) protection.  A novel weave structure and denier (related to thread count per inch) may produce sun protective properties.

A number of fabrics and textiles in common use today need no further UV-blocking enhancement based on their inherent fiberstructure, density of weave, and dye components, especially darker colors and indigo dyes. Good examples of these fabrics contain full percentages or blends of heavy-weight natural fibers like cotton, linen and hemp or light-weight synthetics such as polyester, nylon, spandex and polypropylene. Natural or synthetic indigo-dyed denim, twill weaves and canvas are also good examples. However, a significant disadvantage is the heat retention caused by heavier-weight and darker-colored fabrics.

 

As sun protective clothing is usually meant to be worn during warm and humid weather, some UV-blocking textiles and clothing may be designed with ventilated weaves, moisture wicking and antibacterial properties to assist in cooling and breathability.

 

UPF (Ultraviolet Protection Factor) represents the ratio of sunburn-causing UV without and with the protection of the fabric, similar to SPF (Sun Protection Factor) ratings for sunscreen. While standard summer fabrics have UPF ~6, sun protective clothing typically has UPF ~30, which means that only 1 out of ~30 units of UV will pass through (~3%).

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Related Links https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun_protective_clothing